Foot Center of Pressure Reduces Kinetic Chain Dysfunction and Chronic Pain

If you read my blog before you are well aware that I am a big proponent of identifying human movement dysfunction and correcting functional imbalances to reduce chronic pain, such as knee osteoarthritis (OA), patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), and low back disorders such as sacroiliac dysfunction, facet arthropathy, or generalized lumbago.

A few years ago I read about a new neuromuscular technique called AposTherapy.  For those unfamiliar, AposTherapy corrects gait abnormalities by retraining muscles to adopt an optimal gait mechanics. The primary goal of AposTherapy is to correct the foot center of pressure (COP) during gait. This is done by wearing a unique, foot-worn biomechanical device. At the time, I heard good results about the use of AposTherapy, but data was too young to consider valid just yet or share-able, just yet.

Recently, when looking at functional rehabilitation techniques for chronic knee pain I came across an interesting study in the Journal of Biomechanics the evaluates the benefits of AposTherapy, to correct kinetic chain dysfunction responsible for the development of knee OA (1). The results of the study were significant. Following the intervention patients demonstrated significant reduction in knee adduction (valgus) moment (KAM). Several authors have demonstrated KAM to be a primary cause of knee OA, including Miyazaki, who noted KAM correlates with the progression of knee OA (2). In addition, patients who participated in AposTherapy demonstrated increased walking velocity, reduced pain, and improvement of functional living (1).

The foot-worn biomechanical device alters foot COP, allowing for proper kinetic chain alignment neuromuscular efficiency. Clark and Lucett, noted that dysfunction at one joint precipitates altered movement patterns, at adjacent joints, both proximally and distally (3). This is the foundation of AposTherapy. By correcting  foot COP during gait, altered joint mechanics up the kinetic chain are nullified and neuromuscular efficiency is enhanced. Overtime, strength gains occur allowing for optimal gait patterns. Sharma, stressed the role of neuromuscular ineffciency, suggesting that secondary to elevated joint stress with higher impact loads and altered joint mechanics facilitate the pathogenesis of the chronic joint disease (4).

Biomechanical interventions focusing on foot COP, neuromuscular development and agility, enhance functional ability, reduce pain and increase spatiotemporal patterns of gait (1).  Working knowledge of human movement dysfunction and human movement compensation patterns are prudent to health practitioners.  Health practitioners should emphasize and correct human movement dysfunction when treating clients with chronic joint pain such as and certainly not limited to knee OA, PFPS, SI pain, and other  low back disorders like facet arthropathy.  Training to enhance neuromuscular recruitment, force-coupling, as well as the correction of altered length-tension relationships and poor joint arthrokinematics will go far in reduction of pain, prevention of chronic pain, and improved functional outcomes.

What techniques do you implement to train for optimal neuromuscular efficiency?

References:

1. Haim, A, et al. Reduction in knee adduction moment via non-invasive biomechanical training: A longitudinal gait analysis study. J of Biomechanics. 45 (2012) 41–45.

2. Miyazaki, T., Wada, M., Kawahara, H., et al. Dynamic load at baseline can predict radiographic disease progression in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.  2002. 61, 617–622.

3. Clark, MA, and Lucett, SC. NASM Essentrials of Corrective Exercise Training. Lippincott, WIlliams and Wilkins. 2010.

4. Sharma, L., Dunlop, D.D., Cahue, S., et al. Quadriceps strength and osteoarthritis progression in malaligned and lax knees. Annals of Internal Medicine. 2003. 138, 613–619.

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