Three Exercise Programs You Can Do Anywhere!

Turkey, pumpkin pie, holiday parties, alcohol, sweet treats, 12-hours of college bowl games, and non-stop travel to visit family and friends—the inevitable holiday weight gain. Too many calories and no time or place to work out. When the holiday season comes, people want healthy eating options. I get it, diet is important, but I am not going to be giving out recipes here. If you want a stellar gluten-free mashed potato recipe or a simple salt-free, sugar-free, protein-free honey glazed ham recipe, go elsewhere. I am going to help you get moving. Movement equals calorie burn, and the goal of this blog is to provide you with three exercise programs that you can do anywhere without equipment. The programs are designed as circuit programs, which have been shown to be most effective at burning calories.

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The Great Toe

When you think of the most common lower body injuries, you think ankle sprains, shin splints, runner’s knee, jumper’s knee, fasciitis, or Achilles tendinitis. When you have these injuries, you treat the injured area. We might be overlooking a little, but big deal.  Dysfunction in the big toe influences every step you take, every lunge, every jump, and every stride of every run. Ultimately, it can be a direct result in many of the aforementioned common lower body injuries. If you have dysfunction (pain, instability, or hypomobility) at the first big toe joint (MTP joint), it could wreak havoc on the entire kinetic chain.

Normal range of motion of the big toe is 40° flexion, 80-90° extension, and 10-20° abduction and adduction. Lack of motion, especially extension, will create compensatory movement at other joints. Common big toe issues such as, hallux valgus (bunion), hallux rigidus, turf toe, sesamoiditis, and gout will limit toe mobility. Below is an image of a client who demonstrates normal range or motion on the right and limited toe extension on the left.

N ROM   Limited ROM

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Icing Injuries: Are We Evidence-Based?

Are you an evidence-based practitioner? Think about it; are you really?

An athletic trainer working a Division 1 women’s volleyball tournament with elite Top-25 teams sent me a text: “You should do a study on the average number of ice bags used by volleyball teams after a match… Entire teams are getting ice on both knees and the hitting shoulder. No post-match mobility work, just pounds of ice. Crazy! Some athletic trainers and strength and conditioning coaches are too ignorant and too lazy to provide proper warm-up and cool-down protocols to address mobility.” This is not shocking to me. I worked with Division I volleyball for several years and I observed this too. This is where I learned ice is overused.  This isn’t just a volleyball thing; this is an all-sport issue. Continue reading

Weight Loss: Burn the Treadmill

You’re being duped folks! Long duration cardio training does not make you lose more fat and weight. If I had a dollar for each time I heard the phrase, “… but I need to do cardio so I can burn fat and lose weight…” I’d be rich. This statement couldn’t be further from the truth. I understand where the confusion comes. It’s really not your fault. You’re being hoodwinked by health and wellness companies who put on this persona that they are health experts. They are not. These are simply business savvy folks who misinterpret science and pass garbage on to you. Let me explain.

Graphics like this misguide those seeking weight loss.

Graphics like this misguide those seeking weight loss.

First, the respiratory exchange ratio (RER) says that fat is metabolized greatest when the body is at rest. This is true. However, the aforementioned wellness companies misinterpret this and say that the closer the exercise level is to low intensity, the greater the fat loss. Thus, they try to give you these easy to follow fat burning weight loss guidelines. Have you seen those ridiculous diagrams on cardio machines that say 55%-65% of max heart rate is the “Fat Burning Zone” (see image). We also have trusted magazines like Women’s Health and Fitness that give you a Fat Burning Zone calculator. If you plug data in to the Women’s Health and Fitness calculator you will see that they also recommend you work at approximately 60% max heart rate.  We trust this information and are led to believe that lower intensity, longer duration activity equals weight loss. This is untrue. Continue reading

The Sit-up: So Simple, Yet So bad!

I have nSit upo idea how long the sit-up has been around – a thousand years maybe? Whatever it is we’ve been doing it for a long time. I don’t know how many times I’ve heard “I do crunches every day.”, “I’m working my core.”, or “Look at my 6-pack.”. My responses to those statements: “No you don’t.”, No you’re not.”, and “great, do you want a cookie for your efforts?”  The fact is I see so many people “working their core” and the only thing they are doing is making a bad problem worse. Something so simple and you are doing it wrong!

I do not have a 6-pack. I do not have a 12-pack. I have what some may refer to as a party-ball of Guinness Extra Stout. Ask my wife, she will vouch for this sexy, fuzzy pillow that serves as my beer containment center. Despite my rather portly and ovoid mid-section, I know my core is a lot stronger, more stable, and less susceptible to injury than the 24 yr. old fitness geek down the street referred to as Jacked Jimmy. Yeah, that guy with glistening abs, who at every chance will raise his extra tight wife-beater tank top up, ever so slightly, just so he can hear the throngs of women fall unconsciously to the ground. Yeah that guy. How do I know that I can beat him in a core-off? Because more likely than not, he’s doing it wrong. I’ve seen too many “fit” clients fail miserably when I put them through a core routine. Continue reading

POS: Reduce Pain and Increase Performance

SwingDysfunction of one movement system can lead to a multitude of injuries. Treatment and care for one movement system can prevent our most common ailments. Most potential clients I interview complain of one or more of the following: sacroiliac joint (SIJ) pain and instability, non-specific low back pain (LBP), chronic hamstring strains or tightness, and peri-scapular and thoracic tightness or pain. Whether these complaints are isolated to one body part or involve many, the pain can typically be resolved by treating dysfunction of the Posterior Oblique Subsystem.

 

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RIDS Program: A New Paradigm for ACL Prevention

ACLThe grandeur of the World Cup is upon us. The world’s most popular sport has its chance to shine. As soccer gets its much deserved pedestal, summer camps fill. High school and collegiate soccer athletes become inspired. Training begins and with that begins the season of the ACL. With approximately a quarter-million ACL injuries per year, it is safe to say the injury is common in sport. Though most common in female athletes, ACL injuries happen to anyone anywhere, with soccer, basketball, and gymnastics athletes being at most risk.

While an ACL injury is traumatic in nature, the injury is rarely due to direct trauma. More than 75% of ACL injuries are non-contact in nature (1). Non-contact ACL injuries stem from a complex interaction of anatomical, hormonal and neuromuscular factors. Recent studies suggest that ACL injuries are caused by both neuromuscular fatigue and unanticipated movements commonly found in athletics, such as evasive maneuvers that involve some form of deceleration, change of direction, or landing. The coupling of these movements with modifiable risk factors (see graphic) is what leads to non-contact ACL injury. The good news is that non-contact ACL injury can be prevented by addressing these modifiable risk factors. Continue reading

Butt Battle

A nice booty is not always a good booty.

A nice booty is not always a good booty.

Everyone loves a nice butt. Walking down the street, at the mall, or at the bar, there is bound to be a butt that catches your eye. Like a kitten following a piece of yarn, there is the occasional butt that walks by and causes heads to turn, leaving onlookers with a severe neck strain and mouths agape. Don’t act all innocent and holier than thou, we’ve all done it! Therapists and rehabilitation specialists are no different. In fact they can spend an entire day staring at booty. However, we are not looking to see if “Baby Got Back” or how that plump bump fills a pair of Wranglers, Levis, Seven, or True Religion jeans. We have a reason to look and it is strictly professional; is the little butt working?

For several years now rehabilitation journals have published articles linking a myriad of lower extremity injuries to poor gluteal control. While the glute max – that which makes our heads turn – and the glute minimus are both important, the glute medius is the real problem. We have learned the important role the glute medius has on controlling lower extremity mechanics. Glute medius inhibition precipitates many lower extremity injuries such as ACL tears, Patellofemoral pain, Iliotibial band syndrome, Achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, MTSS (shin splints), the list goes on. Rehabilitation specialists must pay special attention in strengthening the glute med., but how? What is the best exercise?

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Pelvic Upslip and Rotation: Evaluation and Treatment

Pop quiz: What musculoskeletal issue could result in chronic low back pain, chronic Chronic-back-pain-image muscle strains, lower extremity tendinopathies, periscapular pain and tightness, glenohumeral and shoulder girdle pain, or tension headaches? I am sure you can think of a few possibilities, but few can result in all. Often, when a patient reports to our care with one of the aforementioned we immediately think locally. Unfortunately, the real problem could be pelvic upslip, anterior pelvic innominate, or both. Despite being oft-overlooked, these malalignments are not hard to identify if you know what to look for. Continue reading

The Hydration Nation: Hyper-Hydration vs. Dehydration

20140501“Are you drinking water?” “Drink water!” “Hydrate!” “If you’re thirsty it is too late, you are already dehydrated.”  This craze of hydrate, hydrate, hydrate has gone overboard and could be causing more harm than good. Who is more at risk for serious medical complications, the hyper-hydrated or dehydrated. For performance, is it best to be overly hydrated, dehydrated or euhydrated? What follows might surprise you. Continue reading

RICE: The End of an Ice Age

Coaches have used my “RICE” guideline for decades, but now it appears that both Ice and complete Rest may delay healing, instead of helping.” – Gabe Mirkin, MD, March 2014


ice-for-injuriesIn 1978, Gabe Mirkin, MD coined the term RICE. Health care practitioners to laypersons are quick to recognize RICE as the ‘gold standard’ treatment option following injury. Followers of my blog know my stance against ice and now there is support from the physician who coined the term. Yes, the very same physician, Dr. Gabe Mirkin, who coined RICE, is now taking a step back. I reached out to Dr. Mirkin and asked for permission to share his story. As you will read below in Dr. Mirkin’s full post, the lack of evidence for cryotherapy is something we must listen to.

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A Letter To Athletic Trainers

I AM A CERTIFIED ATHLETIC TRAINER!

It’s not often I completely take a post from another, but Mr. Yusuf Boyd, of Biomechaniks in Tennessee and North Carolina wrote a post last week that was on point! While I do not agree with everything in the post, what he says has a lot of merit and is worthy of a share.

I love Athletic Training and my fellow Athletic Trainers, but honestly this is the whiniest group on the face of the planet. March is National Athletic Training month; slogans fill my twitter feed: “I love my Athletic Trainer”, “Athletic Trainers’ save lives”, “My Athletic Trainer has my back.” Great, I am glad we are a prideful bunch, but enough of this holier-than-thou attitude. All I hear is “I am a Certified Athletic Trainer! I deserve respect!” It sounds like a crying toddler who didn’t get a lollipop from the dentist.

This very profession that demands respect also has many of its constituents complaining about the BOC’s new Evidence Based Practice CEU requirements. Really, you want more respect, but will moan and complain when our certifying agency and association wants higher standards? Continue reading

3C’s + P Approach to Successful Outcomes

How many times have you racked your head wondering; why is this not getting better? How come they’re still in pain? How do we have all of this evidence and knowledge at our disposal, yet individuals do not respond as anticipated? The science says, for injury ‘Z’ treat with ‘X’ and rehabilitate with ‘Y’, yet when we apply those tools they don’t work? Why are they not getting better? What are you doing wrong? What are they doing wrong? Continue reading

Low Back Pain in Runners: In a Battle of Muscle Supremacy, Evil Prevails

Introduction:Chronic-back-pain-image

When we think of running injuries we immediately think lower extremity, IT Band syndrome, Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome, Achilles Tendinopathy, Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome, Plantar Fasciitis, and the like.  However, one of the most common and debilitating injuries in runners is low back pain.  So why are runners so at risk of developing low back pain? Most musculoskeletal injuries are multifactorial, but more often than not many chronic injuries result from underlying movement dysfunction.

Vladamir Janda (1928-2002) revolutionized human movement dysfunction and rehabilitation in 1979 when he described three compensatory movement syndromes.  These syndromes were a result of pattern overload (i.e. running) and static posturing. Janda recognized that certain muscles were prone to weakness while others were overactive. He continually investigated these movement syndromes and later learned that the muscle imbalances were systematic, predictable, involved the entire body, and a common cause of injury. Continue reading

Causes and Treatment of Achilles Tendinopathy

Overview and etiology:

Pain and injury to the Achilles tendon is often thought to be a result of inflammation.

Pain and injury to the Achilles tendon is often thought to be a result of inflammation.

The term “tendinitis” or any [insert any body part] with “itis” is tossed around as if it is the only possible cause for musculoskeletal pain. However, the “itis” is not really true. A tendon, specifically the Achilles tendon, is not really inflamed, rather it is deranged (tendiopathic / tendinopathy). In January 2013 the Annals of Human Genetics published an article that demonstrated Achilles Tendinopathy is associated with gene polymorphism (Abrahams, et al., 2013). COL51A is a gene that encodes the development and organization of Type V collagen. This collagen can be found in ligaments, tendons, and connective tissue. COL51A plays an integral role in development and maintenance of connective tissue. Abrahams, et al. (2013) demonstrated that polymorphisms occur in the COL51A gene causing altered structure of collagen resulting in tendinopathy.

The tendon may become fusiform or thickened, but it is due to cellular derangement rather than inflammation. Kannus and Jozsa in a controlled study of 891 patients with Achilles tendon rupture found that 97% of patients had degenerative changes in the ruptured tendon. The study also found that 34% of asymptomatic tendons also had degenerative changes (2) Continue reading