Category Archives: Women

Pregnancy Fitness Program Using TRX RIP Trainer

Watch the video below as I take my client who is 8 months pregnant through a 30 minute total-body circuit program using only the RIP Trainer by TRX.

A little over a year ago I wrote “A Runner’s Story: From Pain to Performance” which is about a client I began working with about 2 years ago. When we met, the simple task of walking caused sharp pain in her hips and had essentially given up on her long-time passion of running.

After a few months of working together she was racing 5ks and 10ks. In one year’s time (April, 2014) she ran the Illinois half-marathon. I still train her today, but now we have a new challenge; she’s expecting a baby at the end of March. Continue reading

RIDS Program: A New Paradigm for ACL Prevention

ACLThe grandeur of the World Cup is upon us. The world’s most popular sport has its chance to shine. As soccer gets its much deserved pedestal, summer camps fill. High school and collegiate soccer athletes become inspired. Training begins and with that begins the season of the ACL. With approximately a quarter-million ACL injuries per year, it is safe to say the injury is common in sport. Though most common in female athletes, ACL injuries happen to anyone anywhere, with soccer, basketball, and gymnastics athletes being at most risk.

While an ACL injury is traumatic in nature, the injury is rarely due to direct trauma. More than 75% of ACL injuries are non-contact in nature (1). Non-contact ACL injuries stem from a complex interaction of anatomical, hormonal and neuromuscular factors. Recent studies suggest that ACL injuries are caused by both neuromuscular fatigue and unanticipated movements commonly found in athletics, such as evasive maneuvers that involve some form of deceleration, change of direction, or landing. The coupling of these movements with modifiable risk factors (see graphic) is what leads to non-contact ACL injury. The good news is that non-contact ACL injury can be prevented by addressing these modifiable risk factors. Continue reading

Postpartum Weight Loss

€~

One of the most common inquires I get is from new moms looking to lose that postpartum belly. How is it possible that celebrities like Heidi Klum can drop 30-40 pounds in just 4 months?  Anna Paquin goes from twins to 6-pack abs in 5 months. For new moms, that is frustrating, when you work so hard to lose stubborn body weight. What do they do that you don’t? Trust me, there is no super-secret information or magic formula that only they are privy to. You have the same physiology and weight loss capabilities as Hollywood superstars.

Normal weight gain during pregnancy is 30-35 pounds. Roughly 10 pounds is lost immediately after birth – seven pounds for the baby, plus two-three for blood, amniotic fluid and other. Through the first week your body will flush another 5 pounds of reserved water weight.  Optimal weight loss should be 1-2 pounds per week. If you do the math, you will find that Anna Paquin and Heidi Klum lost about 2 pounds per week.  Suddenly, Heidi and Anna’s weight loss isn’t so dramatic, does it? A loss of 1-2 pounds per week is easily attainable if you are diet compliant and dedicated to exercise. Continue reading

Women are Wimps!!

STOP! Before you start throwing knives at my head I don’t really think women are wimps. If I did my wife would be waiting for me when I get home to prove me wrong. In fact, it is quite the opposite. Women have demonstrated continued increase in sports endeavors and are much faster, more aggressive and powerful than in past decades. However, secondary to the increased participation in sport, women are sustaining many more injuries.

Females between the ages of 15-25 years are most often injured, with the majority of these injuries are to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL).  Females are 2-5 times more likely than males to sustain an injury to the ACL. This injury is primarily noted in basketball and soccer, but is still prevalent in many other sports such as volleyball, softball and gymnastics.  Women over the age of 25 are also more susceptible to recreational sporting injuries compared to males.  Many of these injuries are also musculoskeletal in nature, such as ankle sprains, shoulder tendinopathy, and chronic knee pain such as chondromalacia, PFPS and ITB Syndrome. Looking at the glass half-full though,most of these injuries can be prevented with correction of movement dysfunction.

With the increased participation in sport and the commonality of musculoskeletal injuries it is prudent to understand typical movement dysfunction patterns that bring about these injuries.  Secondary to genetics, body morphology and muscle recruitment females are susceptible to lower extremity impairment syndrome.

Lower extremity impairment syndrome is a combination of muscle imbalances, joint dysfunction, and poor muscle recruitment patterns from the low back to the foot. The impairment syndrome can be characterized by foot pronation, knee valgus, femoral internal rotation, and lordosis at the low back.  When performing functional activities, such as running or cutting, these characterizations are amplified. Ultimately, this leads to ACL tears or the aforementioned chronic pain syndromes.

The good news is these poor biomechanical patterns can be corrected following focused rehabilitation techniques designed to improve muscle synergy as well as joint mechanics. Many studies have been done to show a significant reduction in the incidence of injuries, such as ACL tears, by correcting these impairments. If you are having chronic pain in the lower extremity, it might be a result of lower extremity impairment. This is a good thing, because it can be corrected.