Tag Archives: chronic inflammation

Recommended Readings for Health and Wellness Geeks: March, 2013

Each day we are bombarded with new data. My goal is to share a breakdown of what I have discovered and read this past month. There is a little something for everyone here. How do I choose which articles to share? Is it clinically relevant? Does the story share something new or raise an interesting question? Most studies have some internal flaw that can be poked and while I try to only share those having high quality, my number one goals is to share something unique, progressive or surprising.

Published research:

In the recent release of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition there is a good article supporting the benefits of a high-protein breakfast. Data reveals that a high-protein diet alters ghrelin and peptide YY concentrations subsequently leading to decreased appetite and also curbed late night snacking. Is this study perfect – no. But it is pretty darn good – Yes. I have been blogging on this topic for sometime. Where, when and why did the public begin thinking high protein intake is unhealthy? Did you know quality of protein is measured by how it compares to egg protein? That is because the protein in egg, albumin, has near perfect amino acid distribution. Yet many consider eggs bad.

Here is another topic area I have been yapping about for some time – risk factors for hamstring strains. This systematic literature review was first published online and is now in print in the latest edition of the British Journal of Sports Medicine. This SLR included 34 articles for review, which is a pretty good number to include. Unfortunately, only 1 evaluated hip extension strength. Three found decreased hip extension ROM measures indicating shortened hip flexors. It baffles me as to why studies do not look at glute weakness and hip flexor tightness as a risk factor for hamstring strains. I’ve written about this and hope someday a good study will come out and study the correlation.

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury – MTBI is getting a lot of media attention lately and rightfully so. NFL labor union disputes and an enormous amount of published research has athletes and parents taking MTBI seriously. If that wasn’t enough, Junior Seau’s suicide was linked to depression secondary to chronic TBI. In the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, April 2013 issue, an article discusses depression after TBI. It’s a nice short quick-hitting synopsis, with full-text available.

Website finds:

I subscribe to daily email updates from ScienceDialy. Two or three times per week they share something good that I get caught reading. Two articles they shared link positive benefits of Vitamin D. One shows that Vitamin D replacement improves muscle efficiency and another found Vitamin D may lower diabetes risk in children. Now I am not advocating to go overboard on Vitamin D, but I am saying drink Vitamin D fortified milk and cereals and get outside in the sun to ensure you are getting adequate vitamin D.

ScienceDaily also had an write-up that I loved regarding foods to help fight inflammation. The article states citrus fruits, dark leafy green vegetables, tomatoes, and foods high in omega-3s, such as salmon are anti-inflammatory foods. Notice none of these foods are grains, breads and/or pasta. All are earth foods and not processed. This supports and is similar to blogs I wrote previously: how the US Food Guide Pyramid and MyPlate could be to blame for our chronic disease epidemic, another which is very similar linking arthritis and osteoarthritis to diet. Finally two of my most popular posts written Stop Destroying Your Body and Is Your Diet Making You Sick discuss the link between diet and disease.

Must Read Blogs:

There are so many smart people out there and I enjoy learning from them all. Here are some good blog posts from this month.

The first is from Sport Injury Matt (@SportInjuryMatt – twitter handle). He had two posts about foot mechanics and foot wear. Part I shares good crucial information on foot mechanics. Part II of this post talks about what one should run in and considerations when selecting certain shoes.

My good friend Jay Barss (@sportsrehabtalk – twitter handle) is new to the blog and twitter world. He is a smart dude and deserves some following. His most recent post talks about the a new perspective on management on patellofemoral pain management. As we all know, correction of faulty movement patterns is critical in management of the oft-diagnosed PFPS.

Last is a series posted by  Allan Besselink (@abesselink – twitter handle). If you have not followed Allan’s blog I highly recommend it. In fact his blog was recently nominated as top choice for health and wellness. Everything he posts is high quality. I particularly liked his three-part series titled the Low Back Pain Paradox. Low back pain effects 80% of the adult population and Allan does a great job covering all the bases in Part I, Part II, and Part III.

Stay healthy and well!

Is Your Diet Making You Sick?

Inflammation is the body’s biological response to repair tissue and initiate healing after injurious stimuli has damaged tissue. When an irritant begins to damage tissue, a chemical response ensues. This response causes significant signs: Pain, Heat, Redness, Swelling and loss of function. Inflammation is how we survive and heal. Without this natural response, disease would take over our body. Inflammation is necessary; however, it can also be a serious problem, especially when the condition becomes chronic.

The inflammatory response is the same regardless of the location or the stimulus that caused injury. After trauma occurs hemodynamic changes occur along with the production of exudate or edema. In acute inflammation, the tissue initiates a repair and remodeling event to return tissue to a normal state. If the inflammation fails to resolve, or inflammatory mediators remained elevated, the tissue will begin a cyclical process of a continued inflammatory response; this is when chronic inflammation occurs.

Chronic inflammation is a common factor that may contribute to development of chronic diseases (1). Many diseases are now classified as inflammatory diseases, such as, vasculitis, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and arthritis. Elevated C-reactive protein (CPR) in the blood is a sign of inflammation. Individuals with chronically elevated CRP are three times more likely to have a heart attack than those who have low –levels. Now, studies are finding a correlation between chronic inflammation, chronic disease and poor diet.

Researchers have found the diet has an influence on inflammation. Specifically, excessive consumption of refined carbohydrates, low dietary fiber intake, and a high omega-6 to omega-3 ratios are strongly associated with the production of proinflammatory molecules (2). Additionally, antioxidant’s decrease inflammation, and the low intake of antioxidants contributes to a proinflammatory state exacerbates disease (2). One large study compared a Western diet and a paleo-like diet. The western diet contained more red meat, refined carbohydrates and saturated fat. The Western diet group had greater levels of inflammatory markers, including CRP and E-selectin (3). Those following the paleo-like diet had a significant decrease of inflammatory markers (3).

In addition, the Mediterranean diet, which is comprised of whole grains and omega-3 fatty acids was found to reduce inflammatory markers compared to baseline levels and eliminate metabolic syndrome after two years of following a Mediterranean diet and exercise (4).   Cytokines, which are another key for chronic inflammation, are released by adipocytes. Thus general fat loss can reduce the expression of cytokines.

Clinical studies in adults with high cholesterol have shown that nuts lower LDL-cholesterol while improving the overall blood lipid profile (5). Frequent nut and seed consumption is associated with lower levels of inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP), IL-6 and fibrinogen, even after adjusting for confounding factors(6). Consuming a high-almond diet (68 g/d per 8386 kJ) for four weeks significantly decreased serum E-selectin compared with the control diet in healthy men and women (6).

Chronic inflammation is linked to chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and arthritis. The rise of these diseases over the past few decades may be linked to the Western diet of saturated fats, low antioxidants, and refined carbohydrates. A diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids such as fish and nuts as well as whole grains and high fiber have been shown to reduce chronic inflammation markers in the blood. Diet plays a much larger role than previously thought in the prevention of chronic disease. Are you ready to change your diet?

References:

  1. Stehouwer CDA, Gall M-A. Twisk JWR, Knudsen E. Emeis JJ. Parving H-H. Increased urinary albumin excretion, endothelial dysfunction and chronic low-grade inflammation in type 2 diabetes: progressive, interrelated, and independently associated with risk of death. Diabetes. 2002;51(4): 1157-1165.
  2. Neustadt J. Western Diet and Inflammation. IMCJ. Vol. 10: 2  Apr/May 2011.
  3. Lopez-Garcia E, Schulze MB, Fung TT, et al. Major dietary patterns are related to plasma concentrations of markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Am JClin Nutr. 2004;80(4):1029-1035.
  4. Neustadt J. The food pyramid and disease prevention. Integr Med. 2005;4(6):14-19.
  5. Mukuddem-Petersen J, Oosthuizen W & Jerling J. A systematic review of the effects of nuts on blood lipid profiles in humans. J Nutr. 135: 2005. 2082–2089.
  6. Rajaram, S, Connell, KM, and Sabate´ J. Effect of almond-enriched high-monounsaturated fat diet on selected markers of inflammation: a randomised, controlled, crossover study. BR J of Nut.  2010: 103, 907–912.