Tag Archives: gluteus medius

12 Booty Exercises to Improve the Back Side

 The glutes (not counting the core) are the single most important muscle group for athletic performance and injury prevention. 

Booty

I prefer a booty that has a functional purpose.

I am an ass man. Not in a sexual context, but in a functional movement context.  I do not care if you are fat, skinny, or look great in a pair of yoga pants. If your glutes function at an optimal level you will have better athletic performance and prevent injury. Over the years, I have worked with a variety of clients and the glutes are a focus for all of my clients. It does not matter what your current fitness level is; if you want to prevent injury, boost performance, or become more fitter, the butt is key.

Ask any client I have trained, and they will tell you that I will destroy your glutes – in a good way. Over time, I have developed some favorite booty-popping exercises.  In clinical research, there isn’t any published data that truly says these exercises are best. What you have here is based on my clinical experience and what I have found to work best. These exercises are designed to give you optimal gluteal function and they might even make you look good in a pair of jeans.

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Planks: You’re Doing Them Wrong

Here’s a challenge: I bet you cannot do a forward or side plank for 1 minute straight. Many people will say that is easy. So, let me rephrase: I bet you cannot do a forward or side plank properly for 1 minute straight.

Many fitness enthusiasts choose planks to work the core, but are they really working the core? When I observe clients perform the plank exercise, 9 out of 10 fail to perform the exercise properly. Take a look at the common compensation patterns that occur during the plank exercise and then challenge yourself. Can you do the exercise for 1 minute, with perfect technique, and without compensation? Continue reading

Butt Battle

A nice booty is not always a good booty.

A nice booty is not always a good booty.

Everyone loves a nice butt. Walking down the street, at the mall, or at the bar, there is bound to be a butt that catches your eye. Like a kitten following a piece of yarn, there is the occasional butt that walks by and causes heads to turn, leaving onlookers with a severe neck strain and mouths agape. Don’t act all innocent and holier than thou, we’ve all done it! Therapists and rehabilitation specialists are no different. In fact they can spend an entire day staring at booty. However, we are not looking to see if “Baby Got Back” or how that plump bump fills a pair of Wranglers, Levis, Seven, or True Religion jeans. We have a reason to look and it is strictly professional; is the little butt working?

For several years now rehabilitation journals have published articles linking a myriad of lower extremity injuries to poor gluteal control. While the glute max – that which makes our heads turn – and the glute minimus are both important, the glute medius is the real problem. We have learned the important role the glute medius has on controlling lower extremity mechanics. Glute medius inhibition precipitates many lower extremity injuries such as ACL tears, Patellofemoral pain, Iliotibial band syndrome, Achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, MTSS (shin splints), the list goes on. Rehabilitation specialists must pay special attention in strengthening the glute med., but how? What is the best exercise?

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Knee Pain? Ignore it; Fix the Hip!

I have posted on this topic many, many times. Unfortunately, many still revert to antiquated rehabiltiation protocols. Thus, I feel compelled to keep talking about it.  If you or a client has knee pain focus on the hip, not the knee. There is so much data out there on linking decreased glute strength to knee pain. A weak or inhibited glute medius is unable to control femoral internal rotation and obligatory knee frontal plane motion.  These motions are a primary cause in knee pain – traumatic and acute. Today I discovered two, recently-published, systematic reviews to prove my point.

The first review examined 47 studies which looked at factors causing Patellofemoral Pain Syndromeknee_patella_intro01  (PFPS) (1). This review identified decreased muscle strength for hip abduction and hip external rotation as an important factor associated with the cause of PFPS. The pooled data also found increased Q-angle and sulcus angle to be factors – both of which have been linked to muscle imbalance.

The second systematic review was more specific by evaluating gluteal muscle activity – via EMG – and PFPS (2). The authors identified ten studies to be included in their review, with six of these studies considered to be high-quality and eight studies having a score of 8 or higher on the Downs and Black scale. The authors conclude there is moderate to strong evidence linking delayed or short Glute medius muscle activity to PFPS. The authors also state, “If gluteal muscle activation is delayed, frontal and transverse plane hip motion control may be impaired, leading to increased stress on the PFJ and subsequent symptoms associated with PFPS.”

Rehabilitation practitioners should note this when developing rehabilitation programs. Specifically targeting glute weakness and inhibition will limit hip internal rotation and obligatory knee frontal plane motion. Correcting faulty movement patterns will allow for optimal neuromuscular recruitment and joint kinematics, ultimately relieving or preventing pain.

If you are wondering which exercises will target the glute medius look at the study published in the recent JOSPT (3) and my recent blog titled “The Glute vs TFL Muscle Battle: Proper Exercise Selection to Correct Muscle Imbalance. The data represented in the JOSPT article demonstrate the bilateral bridge, unilateral bridge, side step, clam, squat and two quadruped exercises are best for activating the glute medius.

Are you ready to change your rehabilitation program?

References:

  1. Lankhorst NE, Bierma-Zeinstra, SMA, and van Middelkoop, M. Factors associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a systematic review.  Br J Sports Med.  2013;47:193–206.
  2. Barton CJ, Lack, S, Malliaras, P, and Morrissey, D. Gluteal muscle activity and patellofemoral pain syndrome: a systematic review. Br J Sports Med. 2013; 47:207–214.
  3. Selkowitz, DM, Beneck, GJ, and Powers CM. Which Exercises Target the Gluteal Muscles While Minimizing Activation of the Tensor Fascia Lata? Electromyographic Assessment Using Fine-Wire Electrodes. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2013; 43(2):54-64.