Tag Archives: vitamin d

Multivitamins: A Multibillion Dollar Waste of Money

Pills Pouring out of BottleIt’s a shame that a multibillion dollar industry is fueled by misleading people. The business of supplementation is championed by big businesses who utilize fear-mongering tactics to influence the public. These companies disseminate biased data and purport ridiculous claims. ‘We are a nation of rising chronic disease, take this multivitamin.’ ‘We are a nation of malnourished kids, take this multivitamin.’ ‘Autism linked to vitamin deficiency, take this multivitamin.’ ‘Agriculture has ruined our soil; it is depleted of nutrients, take this multivitamin.’ It is an infestation of pseudoscience propaganda that gets delivered daily to our email inbox and shared via social media.

Last night, I was in my normal geek mode and came across a news story on my Flipboard feed; Are multivitamins a waste of money?  I was glad to see an article disputing the inaccurate claims made by the industry. The article quotes an editorial published in this week’s Annals of Internal Medicine to support the claim that using supplements and multivitamins to prevent chronic conditions is a waste of money.

Hallelujah! Continue reading

Recommended Readings for Health and Wellness Geeks: March, 2013

Each day we are bombarded with new data. My goal is to share a breakdown of what I have discovered and read this past month. There is a little something for everyone here. How do I choose which articles to share? Is it clinically relevant? Does the story share something new or raise an interesting question? Most studies have some internal flaw that can be poked and while I try to only share those having high quality, my number one goals is to share something unique, progressive or surprising.

Published research:

In the recent release of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition there is a good article supporting the benefits of a high-protein breakfast. Data reveals that a high-protein diet alters ghrelin and peptide YY concentrations subsequently leading to decreased appetite and also curbed late night snacking. Is this study perfect – no. But it is pretty darn good – Yes. I have been blogging on this topic for sometime. Where, when and why did the public begin thinking high protein intake is unhealthy? Did you know quality of protein is measured by how it compares to egg protein? That is because the protein in egg, albumin, has near perfect amino acid distribution. Yet many consider eggs bad.

Here is another topic area I have been yapping about for some time – risk factors for hamstring strains. This systematic literature review was first published online and is now in print in the latest edition of the British Journal of Sports Medicine. This SLR included 34 articles for review, which is a pretty good number to include. Unfortunately, only 1 evaluated hip extension strength. Three found decreased hip extension ROM measures indicating shortened hip flexors. It baffles me as to why studies do not look at glute weakness and hip flexor tightness as a risk factor for hamstring strains. I’ve written about this and hope someday a good study will come out and study the correlation.

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury – MTBI is getting a lot of media attention lately and rightfully so. NFL labor union disputes and an enormous amount of published research has athletes and parents taking MTBI seriously. If that wasn’t enough, Junior Seau’s suicide was linked to depression secondary to chronic TBI. In the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, April 2013 issue, an article discusses depression after TBI. It’s a nice short quick-hitting synopsis, with full-text available.

Website finds:

I subscribe to daily email updates from ScienceDialy. Two or three times per week they share something good that I get caught reading. Two articles they shared link positive benefits of Vitamin D. One shows that Vitamin D replacement improves muscle efficiency and another found Vitamin D may lower diabetes risk in children. Now I am not advocating to go overboard on Vitamin D, but I am saying drink Vitamin D fortified milk and cereals and get outside in the sun to ensure you are getting adequate vitamin D.

ScienceDaily also had an write-up that I loved regarding foods to help fight inflammation. The article states citrus fruits, dark leafy green vegetables, tomatoes, and foods high in omega-3s, such as salmon are anti-inflammatory foods. Notice none of these foods are grains, breads and/or pasta. All are earth foods and not processed. This supports and is similar to blogs I wrote previously: how the US Food Guide Pyramid and MyPlate could be to blame for our chronic disease epidemic, another which is very similar linking arthritis and osteoarthritis to diet. Finally two of my most popular posts written Stop Destroying Your Body and Is Your Diet Making You Sick discuss the link between diet and disease.

Must Read Blogs:

There are so many smart people out there and I enjoy learning from them all. Here are some good blog posts from this month.

The first is from Sport Injury Matt (@SportInjuryMatt – twitter handle). He had two posts about foot mechanics and foot wear. Part I shares good crucial information on foot mechanics. Part II of this post talks about what one should run in and considerations when selecting certain shoes.

My good friend Jay Barss (@sportsrehabtalk – twitter handle) is new to the blog and twitter world. He is a smart dude and deserves some following. His most recent post talks about the a new perspective on management on patellofemoral pain management. As we all know, correction of faulty movement patterns is critical in management of the oft-diagnosed PFPS.

Last is a series posted by  Allan Besselink (@abesselink – twitter handle). If you have not followed Allan’s blog I highly recommend it. In fact his blog was recently nominated as top choice for health and wellness. Everything he posts is high quality. I particularly liked his three-part series titled the Low Back Pain Paradox. Low back pain effects 80% of the adult population and Allan does a great job covering all the bases in Part I, Part II, and Part III.

Stay healthy and well!

Eat This! Don’t Take That!

Multivitamins, fish oil, antioxidants, vitamin D, B-complex vitamins, conjugated linoleic acid, amino acids, protein powders, chromium, pyruvate, GuChomps/Gel Packs, creatine, fat burners, how many supplements do we need? You might be sick of hearing me say this, but let your body do its job. Why all of a sudden do we feel it is necessary to incorporate supplements in our diet? Our body has always been able to do its job.

Supplements are just that, designed to supplement, not overrun the diet. We only need enough to make up for shortfall of our recommended dietary allowance. RDA is the dietary intake level of a nutrient considered sufficient by the Food and Nutrition Board. These nutrient levels are set to meet the needs for over 95% of the population. The kicker is that most balanced diets of 2,000 calories will meet these needed levels. Eating more is not better.

Without a doubt, nutrients play an integral in human physiology, but over abundance of a particular nutrient may inhibit other physiological functions, creating a nutrient tug-o-war. There are Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (UL) that are set to caution against excessive nutrient consumption, because it can be harmful. Yet, despite eating a balanced meal, many still take additional supplements that can have significant adverse reactions.

There are a scant few in the population that actually need supplements. For example, nursing or pregnant women, those with strict calorie restrictions or nutritional deficits secondary food intolerance, seniors or those with medical illness and some athletes. But, these individuals need a select few supplements, not excessive amounts of unnecessary supplements.

For this blog, I wanted to talk about the most common nutritional supplements, share their toxicity effects and then provide a reasonable food source that is a better choice that the supplement of choice.

Don’t Take That: Multivitamin

Really, is your body deficient in 30 plus vitamins and minerals? You might be deficient in 1 or 2, but not all. Many times the vitamin / mineral intake level of a the standard multivitamin far exceeds RDA levels and sometimes certain vitamins or minerals are near the UL. Now, add this with normal eating and you are certain to go beyond the UL in many of your vitamins and minerals. This creates toxic effects, which can alter normal body physiology, cause illness, and inhibit other minerals from doing their job.

Eat This! A Well-balance meal

This is easy, to get all of your vitamins and minerals in adequate levels eat a well-balanced meal that meets your caloric needs. This will prevent toxicity and get all vitamins and nutrients for optimal human functioning.

Don’t Take That: Vitamin D

Vitamin D certainly has a positive impact on the body, including increased bone mineral density. Unfortunately, chronic overdose of Vitamin D can lead to hyperparathyroidism and hypercalcemia, which can lead to nausea, weakness, insomnia, and even renal failure.

Eat This! Mushrooms, fish, and sunlight.

Most of the Vitamin D needed for you body can be achieved through our own internal synthesis. In just 10-15 minutes of sunlight your skin will begin to synthesize vitamin D. However, if you live in a cave, or are nocturnal, eat fish – catfish, salmon, mackerel with a side of mushrooms to get your vitamin D needs.

Don’t Take That: Omega-3

Omega-3 fatty acids or fish oils are the absolute best fat one can have. They are best known for the significant cardiovascular benefits. Unfortunately, excessive amounts cause excessive bleeding, stroke, headaches,  increased blood glucose levels, and Gastrointestinal disorders.

Eat This! Fish, avacados, nuts, flax seeds, oils

There are many foods that are rich in Omega-3 fatty acids. It is easy to get the recommended amount in the typical diet. In addition, to the richness of Omega-3 content you also get all the other nutrients that accompany these foods, making food a much better option than the supplement.

Don’t Take That: B-Complex Vitamins

A water soluble vitamin that has many positive effects such as reduced stress, increased energy, and higher metabolic rates. Since B vitamins are water soluble toxic effects are rare as the excess is typically excreted in urine. However, Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is linked to peripheral neuroathy, and B12 is linked to pernicious anemia disease, but these are rare. Others have been linked to skin and neurological disorders. The biggest factor here is that we rarely need them

Eat This! Most foods

Found in most unprocessed foods, plants, dairy products, meats and fortified cereals, it is rare that we have a deficiency in B-vitamins. If you are stressed, or lacking energy, go exercise – don’t take a pill, you will just excrete it all in a few hours anyway.

Don’t Take That: Vitamin C

Known for it’s ability to boost the immune system, vitamin C is widely used and found as an additive to many foods. That said the research to support these claims are suspect at best. Vitamin C is also known as an effective antioxidant for its ability to reduce oxidative stress, through removal of free radicals. As a water soluble vitamin, excess Vitamin C is excreted in the urine, however, there is a  risk for diarrhea and in rare cases the formation of kidney stones is possible.

Eat This! Citrus Fruits

Rich sources include oranges, peppers, grapefruits, peaches, papayas, pineapples, broccoli, strawberries, tomatoes, and melons.

Don’t Take That: Protein Supplement

Protein supplements, particularly, meal replacement shakes with a 4:1 carbohydrate to protein ratio taken 15-45 minutes after exercise, has significant benefits for refueling lost energy stores. Sadly, most will take protein supplements throughout the day – even when not exercising. Very little quality evidence exists showing positive effects of more than 2 grams/kg body weight of protein per day. Most literature recommends 1.2-1.8 grams / kg of body weight per day.  Then there is the other theory that our body can only digest a certain amount of protein per hour – so excessive amounts gets converted or is passed through. So why spend the money?

Eat This! Meat, dairy, some plants

If you are exercising a post workout protein shake might be beneficial. If you are skipping meals, a protein shake might be beneficial. Otherwise save your money, eat  lean meats such as turkey, chicken, pork, and fish. In addition, dairy products, and beans are good protein sources. It’s cheaper and tastes better than chalk flavored milk.

Don’t Take That: Energy Gummies

These have become the rage for long distance endurance athletes. Energy gummies are filled with electrolytes, antioxidants, and amino acids to combat breakdown, fatigue and provide long lasting energy. Great right? Sure, but why spend the money if something cheaper works just as well or better.

Eat This! Raisins

A study published a few years ago compared raisins vs. energy gummies. There was no difference in performance between the raisin group and the gummy group. In addition, the raisin group showed a lower insulin spike when compared to the gummy group, a win for the raisin. Plus, the raisin group demonstrated higher free fatty acid content in the blood post activity. What does this mean, for the same performance gains, raisins allowed for more fat metabolism vs. gummy candy – most of us could stand to lose fat.

I know I will catch flack for this. Many of my friends are big supplement supporters. Yes, supplements do serve a purpose, but only in moderation and only if you need it. If you question whether or not you need a supplement, seek consultation from a registered dietitian – they will evaluate your diet and tell you exactly what you need.